Taizan was the third son of a farmer in Izumi (southern Osaka Prefecture), and the details of his early training are unclear. During his early painting study, Taizan enjoyed the patronage a wealthy shipping merchant in his hometown, who introduced him to Okada Hanko a respected Osaka literati painter and shortly thereafter to Nukina Kaioku, an esteemed Confucian scholar and painter-calligrapher in Kyoto. Although the nature of their teacher-pupil relationship remains ambiguous, it is believed that Kaioku's encouragement was crucial in Taizan's decision to focus on literati painting. For example, on Kaioku's advice, Taizan made numerous trips to the Kumano area (Wakayama prefecture) to study its scenic mountains.
In 1846 Taizan settled in Kyoto and quickly established himself as a painter. As his reputation spread, Taizan enjoyed the support of many samurai lords and aristocrats an became acquainted with illustrious members of the Kyoto literati circle. (Morioka, Michiyo, in: Literati Modern, pp. 263-264)

With an inscription on the inside of the box lid by Shirasu Shinka (1871-1938), a literati style painter.

 

Hine Taizan (1813-1869), 1867

Ink on paper

131.6 x 27.6 cm (51 3/4 x 10 3/4 in.)

Mounting: 205 x 38.5 cm (80 3/4 x 15 in.)
Inscription on the box by Shirasu Shinka.

 

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Hine Taizan | Landscape

SKU: 2341
$1,680.00Price
Bachmann Eckenstein