Rusticity, austerity and simplicity - "Chanoyu, the Japanese tea ceremony, which originated in fifteenth-century Kyoto, began as a pastime of the elites - high-ranking warrions, Buddhist monks and aristocrats. By the late sixteenth century, wealthy well-educated urban merchants also participated, one of whom, Sen no Rikyu, codified the now familiar Zen-influenced aesthetic identity for Chanoyu that celebrates rusticity, austerity and simplicity. By Rengetsu's time, the diverse participants in Chanoyu obtained utensils from othodox potter lineages such as Raku, used vessels they made themselves as self-taught amateurs, they obtained them from new sources that included porvinicial kilns and workshops of independent potters, among them nuns such as Rengetsu. (Patricia J. Graham: Otagaki Rengetsu and the Japanese Tea Ceremony, in: Black Robe White Mist, 2007, pp. 63-64)

 

Perfection is easy to achieve. But imperfection is a gift. And the imperfection of this tea bowl is the secret to its appeal, its charm, and its value. When you let this tea bowl sit in your hands again and again it will reveal its secrets one after the other while you enjoy the energetic writing on the outside, explore the depth of the glaze on the inside, or look into the soul of the clay on the bottom of the bowl.

 

Though wishing not to fall in love
is not a sentiment I especially share
my happiness
given by the gods
lives in the Kamo riverbreeze.

 

This bowl does not have a box. But if you want me to have one made for you let me know and send me an email: email@bachmanneckenstein.com

 

Otagaki Rengetsu (1791-1875)

Teabowl
Glazed ceramic

Height 6.7 cm (2 ½ in.)

Diam. 13 cm (5 in.)

Otagaki Rengetsu | Teabowl

SKU: R1712
$3,870.00Price
Bachmann Eckenstein